Madinah Arabic Forums Forums Advanced Clarification on Use of Kasra

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  • #2424

    Abu
    Participant

    Dear,
    Can anyone tell me that why have we used kasra in word ‘Ghurfateka’ in following example from Lesson 11-3:
    أَنَافِذَةُ غُرْفَتِكَ مُغْلَقَةٌ؟
    Why not Ghurfatuka instead of Ghurfateka.
    Also why not use Akhuk instead of Akheek in following example from the same lesson:
    أَيْنَ غُرْفَةُ أَخِيكَ؟
    Similarly same question for مَا اسْمُ أَخِيكَ؟ and وَأَيْنَ غُرْفَةُ أُخْتِكَ؟.

    We are using Damma in أَيْنَ بَيْتُكَ؟ and أَبَيْتُكَ جَمِيلٌ؟ on word bait which is different to above examples. All this can be seen in Lesson 11-3.
    Regards,
    Hamzah

  • #2464

    Madinah Arabic
    Keymaster

    In the example you have shown
    أَنَافِذَةُ غُرْفَتِكَ مُغْلَقَةٌ؟
    أَيْنَ غُرْفَةُ أَخِيكَ؟
    مَا اسْمُ أَخِيكَ؟

    The words (غُرْفَتِكَ ، أَخِيكَ، ، أَخِيكَ) are governed noun مضاف إليه and the governed noun always comes in the genitive case with Kasra, while the words ” نافِذَةُ ” is the subject of the nominal sentence ” مبتدأ ” and” مُغْلَقَةٌ ” is the predicate of the nominal sentence.
    The same applied to the other 2 examples you have stated above so ;

    in the second sentence ” أَيْنَ” is the subject of the nominal sentence while “غُرْفَةُ ” is the predicate so ” أَخِيكَ ” is governed noun مضاف إليه with Kasra

    in the third sentence ” مَا” is the the subject of the nominal sentence while “اسم ” is the predicate so ” أَخِيكَ ” is governed noun مضاف إليه with Kasra

    While the other examples you have listed are totally different cases ; as the sentence ” أَيْنَ بَيْتُكَ؟ ” is only consisting of subject and predicate of the nominal case ” أَيْنَ ” is subject and ” بيْبتُكَ ” is predicate same applied to (أبيتُكَ جميلٌ) it’s also a nominal sentence where بيتُكَ is subject and جميلٌ is predicate so at last that’s why both words are in nominative case with Dammah on the top of the last letter.
    Thank :)

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